Tin Mới

State structure and economic development: The political economy of Thailand and the Philippines :

This dissertation investigates the factors that account for different economic performance among late developing countries that are vulnerable to external shocks, crony capitalism, and political instability. The dissertation undertakes an historical, comparative analysis of industrializing Thailand and relatively low-performing Philippines, and argues that differences in economic performance are due to variations in the institutional configuration of state power, defined along two dimensions: the embeddedness of governing elites in state institutions, and the relationship between the political leadership and economic technocracy in the development policy process.The dissertation adopts the concept of bureaucratic polity, used in Thailand studies, to refer to the series of coalitions between military rulers and senior technocrats that controlled state power for most of that country’s modern history. Thai political rulers and technocrat economic managers were deeply embedded, respectively, in the military and civilian bureaucracies; economic technocrats had relative autonomy from the political rulers. For the Philippines, this study introduces the concept of proprietary polity, a form of elite rule in which personalistic politicians gain power because of their personal wealth, connections, and political skills. Philippine political leaders belonged to weak political parties and recruited technocrats from the private sector. Hence, the development bureaucracy was strongly subordinate to political leaders.

Bộ Sưu Tập : Luận văn Thạc Sĩ
Tác Giả Chính : Antoinette R. Raquiza
Ngôn Ngữ : Eng,
Nơi Xuất Bản : United States ; 2010 ProQuest, UMI Dissertations Publishing,
Mô Tả Vật Lý : 317p.
Tóm Tắt : This dissertation investigates the factors that account for different economic performance among late developing countries that are vulnerable to external shocks, crony capitalism, and political instability. The dissertation undertakes an historical, comparative analysis of industrializing Thailand and relatively low-performing Philippines, and argues that differences in economic performance are due to variations in the institutional configuration of state power, defined along two dimensions: the embeddedness of governing elites in state institutions, and the relationship between the political leadership and economic technocracy in the development policy process.The dissertation adopts the concept of bureaucratic polity, used in Thailand studies, to refer to the series of coalitions between military rulers and senior technocrats that controlled state power for most of that country’s modern history. Thai political rulers and technocrat economic managers were deeply embedded, respectively, in the military and civilian bureaucracies; economic technocrats had relative autonomy from the political rulers. For the Philippines, this study introduces the concept of proprietary polity, a form of elite rule in which personalistic politicians gain power because of their personal wealth, connections, and political skills. Philippine political leaders belonged to weak political parties and recruited technocrats from the private sector. Hence, the development bureaucracy was strongly subordinate to political leaders.
Chủ Đề : Economic development, Economic history, Political science, Social structure,
Tác giả bổ sung :
Số Kiểm Soát : 84446
Luận Văn : State structure and economic development: The political economy of Thailand and the Philippines :
Tên File : 84446.pdf

State structure and economic development: The political economy of Thailand and the Philippines :

Vui lòng liên hệ với chúng tôi qua địa chỉ email : lienlacluanvan@gmail.com để có thể Download tài liệu: State structure and economic development: The political economy of Thailand and the Philippines :

Keyword SEO : State structure and economic development: The political economy of Thailand and the Philippines :